thecivilwarparlor:

George C. Marshall - Civil War Buff and Virginia Military Institute cadet, class of 1901, stands for the camera in dress uniform while holding his elaborately-plumed shako
The Confederate dream has lived on at V.M.I., and the tradition has always been strong. The whole Corp of cadets fought as a unit in the Civil War Battle of Newmarket in Virginia, and twenty per cent of them were killed or wounded.
The General, in fact, was the only cadet graduated in his year who came from above the Mason and Dixon line. He was, perhaps for that reason, especially impressed by legends of the war.
He used to hike over old battlefields near the school and memorize the positions occupied by units of both armies, a habit which became so strong that years afterward, when he was an instructor at the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he was sometimes assigned to come East with parties of officers and take them over the ground covered by the Federal Army of the Potomac and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia , conducting a sort of ambulant seminar on the War Between the States. Even now, when General Marshall is motoring through Virginia, he sometimes has the car stopped while he explains to a companion how A. P. Hill’s corps came out of the woods past a crossroads store and fell upon the hapless flank of some Northern general who had forgotten to post pickets.
http://blog.encyclopediavirginia.org/2012/05/11/general-marshall-man-of-the-gridiron/
Photo (Virginia Historical Society)

thecivilwarparlor:

George C. Marshall - Civil War Buff and Virginia Military Institute cadet, class of 1901, stands for the camera in dress uniform while holding his elaborately-plumed shako

The Confederate dream has lived on at V.M.I., and the tradition has always been strong. The whole Corp of cadets fought as a unit in the Civil War Battle of Newmarket in Virginia, and twenty per cent of them were killed or wounded.

The General, in fact, was the only cadet graduated in his year who came from above the Mason and Dixon line. He was, perhaps for that reason, especially impressed by legends of the war.

He used to hike over old battlefields near the school and memorize the positions occupied by units of both armies, a habit which became so strong that years afterward, when he was an instructor at the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, he was sometimes assigned to come East with parties of officers and take them over the ground covered by the Federal Army of the Potomac and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia , conducting a sort of ambulant seminar on the War Between the States. Even now, when General Marshall is motoring through Virginia, he sometimes has the car stopped while he explains to a companion how A. P. Hill’s corps came out of the woods past a crossroads store and fell upon the hapless flank of some Northern general who had forgotten to post pickets.

http://blog.encyclopediavirginia.org/2012/05/11/general-marshall-man-of-the-gridiron/

Photo (Virginia Historical Society)

Reblogged from thecivilwarparlor

vminews:

House Mountain Ascent

Aug. 28, 2014 – Each company marched its rats up to the cliffs of Big House Mountain today.  The 5.5-mile hike included over 1,600 feet of elevation change, which added to the week’s physical challenges and further built camaraderie among the rats. — VMI Photos by John Robertson IV.

Reblogged from vminews

vminews:

Cadre Shows the Way

Aug. 23, 2014 — Cadre begins the training of the 500 rats who matriculated today.  Their training will last into the night tonight and begin again early tomorrow morning. — VMI Photos by Kevin Remington.

Reblogged from vminews